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1966 Goya Electric Guitars catalogue
1966 Goya Electric Guitars catalogue, Goya was well-known for it's acoustic guitars, produced by Levin in Sweden; but in the mid 1960s they added a number of Italian-built electric guitars and basses. Semi-acoustic models such as the 105, 107 and 109 Rangemaster guitars and Panther II bass were made by Polverini, whilst solid body models 116 and 118 were made by Galanti. These were well-built good quality instruments, but perhaps too expensive to sell in large numbers.
1965 Vox Ace electric guitar
1965 Vox Ace electric guitar The Vox Ace was one of the early UK-designed Vox guitars produced by JMI in Dartford, Kent. It had been in production since at least 1962, but was redesigned for late 1963 with a more current look and a higher quality feel. The pickups were upgraded, as was the body; it was now thicker and made of solid wood. Despite this the guitar was now actually lighter in weight, due to a shorter overall length. Have a closer look at a sunburst-finished Vox Ace from 1965.
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, England
    Posts
    2

    Default ES-330TD Serial number 66985

    Can anybody tell me where and when this guitar was made? It was left to me as part of an old friend's possessions, so I'm not looking to sell it, but I'd like to know a little more of it's history (and maybe a valuation for insurance purposes). Thanks in advance for any help.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
    Posts
    102

    Default

    My guess with chrome hardware & reflector knobs, a 1966. All Gibsons at that time were built in Kalamazoo Michigan, USA. Aprox value is $2,500.00 to $3,100.00.
    Last edited by George Porter; 03-12-2011 at 03:32 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, England
    Posts
    2

    Default Es-330td

    Many thanks, George - very helpful, although after I posted this query, I discovered a serial number listing .pdf file via the Gibson website (http://www.gibson.com/en-us/Support/SerialNumberSearch/) which seemed to imply this would more likely be in a 1964 series - would you agree? I forgot to mention that the number is stamped into the back of the headstock, in case that makes any difference.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    minneapolis, mn
    Posts
    456

    Default

    It could be. Gibson serial numbers can be confusing, as most lists will tell you. They re-used them, they held partially finished guitars, they did all sorts of stuff. You have to narrow it down by potentiometer codes and features. The mid-60s 330s have metal covered pups, so you have to nail down nickle plate vs chrome. It doesn't make much difference for these for value or quality if it is 64 or 66.

    Funny thing is a few years back, these were worth hundreds more than the Epiphone version of the same guitar. Nowadays it is the opposite.
    boom

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    oxford, england
    Posts
    4

    Default es 330

    Hi, newbie here.

    I have a similar looking guitar only with black plastic pickups and a dot fret markers (plus some other differences). serial number 5xx6. supposed to be a 1962.

    On mine, it looks very much like a previous owner took off the original bridge assembly and replaced it with a trapeze tail-piece arrangement. You can see the marks where the original bridge was located. Any ideas why they would do that?

    cheers from UK
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
    Posts
    102

    Default

    It looks like your guitar might have had a Bigsby installed at one time. The previous owner may have taken it off & put the original trapeze tailpiece back one before he sold it. You should see other holes hidden behind the mounting screw of the trapeze tailpiece if this is the case.

    Might be a B7
    http://www.bigsby.com/vibe/products/vibratos/bigsby-b7/
    Last edited by George Porter; 05-17-2011 at 02:27 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    oxford, england
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by George Porter View Post
    It looks like your guitar might have had a Bigsby installed at one time. The previous owner may have taken it off & put the original trapeze tailpiece back one before he sold it. You should see other holes hidden behind the mounting screw of the trapeze tailpiece if this is the case.

    Might be a B7
    http://www.bigsby.com/vibe/products/vibratos/bigsby-b7/
    Thanks George! I think you might be right. On close examination, there is one small hole under the trapeze and another at the end of the tail piece where the strap attaches. THis guitar also has the snot green tuning pegs, not the white ovals that you see on most 330's.

    Cheers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    21

    Default

    Serial # 66985 dates to 1964 which means the guitar was made in Kalamazoo, MI.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    oxford, england
    Posts
    4

    Default

    SERIAL NUMBERS Agree with previous posts on serial numbers: no logic. If 66985 can be dated to 1964, what about my 4 digit (5436) which I was told was 1962?

    HEADSTOCK DAMAGE my guitar shows clear signs of headstock repair - I have read that is very common in 330/335 etc guitars. The head separates from the neck if you drop it. Usually caused by lifting the case without securing the latches. Anyone else notice such repairs?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Buckinghamshire, UK
    Posts
    2,760

    Default Gibson headstock repair

    Quote Originally Posted by nckwlch View Post
    HEADSTOCK DAMAGE my guitar shows clear signs of headstock repair - I have read that is very common in 330/335 etc guitars. The head separates from the neck if you drop it. Usually caused by lifting the case without securing the latches. Anyone else notice such repairs?

    Yes, headstock repairs are very common in 1960s Gibson guitars - they usually used mahogany - which is a brittle, easy to snap wood. The headstock/neck area is weak due to the truss rod adjustment cavity. Also the back leaning headstock.

    These factors combine to make a backward fall put all the impact on that weak area.

    I would say the main cause is leaning them against the amp briefly... then a knock makes them slide sideways, and then fall back. Make sure you have a hard case, and bring your stand to rehearsal!

    In the mid seventies they used maple, with a volute which is much more durable - but there are still mahogany-necked Gibsons being made...

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